Monday, January 7, 2013
Couldn’t agree more! The GIF is great — it’s about more than just cats, people. Marketers, think about ways you can use it to help tell a story or make a point about your brand.
(And yes, I’m back to blogging — what better post to kick off the new year?)
femmebot:



Fantastic use of an animated GIF: comparing the bubbles between a 2005 Chateau Frank (left) and a mid-priced California sparkling wine (right). 
(via Cheap Bubbly Or Expensive Sparkling Wine? Look To The Bubbles For Clues : The Salt : NPR)

Couldn’t agree more! The GIF is great — it’s about more than just cats, people. Marketers, think about ways you can use it to help tell a story or make a point about your brand.

(And yes, I’m back to blogging — what better post to kick off the new year?)

femmebot:

Fantastic use of an animated GIF: comparing the bubbles between a 2005 Chateau Frank (left) and a mid-priced California sparkling wine (right). 

(via Cheap Bubbly Or Expensive Sparkling Wine? Look To The Bubbles For Clues : The Salt : NPR)

Thursday, September 13, 2012
Heh x2. 
cdixon:

samspratt:

The 5 Stages of iPhone 5 Grief

heh

Heh x2. 

cdixon:

samspratt:

The 5 Stages of iPhone 5 Grief

heh

Friday, April 20, 2012

Unplugged in Roma

Last week I traveled to Rome for a week of sightseeing, relaxation, and Italian wine. I brought no electronics — no computer, no iPad, no smartphone. Not even a dumbphone. I checked my email a handful of times at our hotel’s computer, but by and large I was unplugged.

As a digital marketing professional and a professional internet addict, I wondered how I would react. Would I be itching for my phone all week? Or would I get over it and have one of those amazing “unplugged” experiences everyone talks about — when you have an epiphany about your electronics use and your time in the “real world” is transformative?

My experience was somewhere in the middle. It was odd to not have any connection to the internet on the go. But I was in one of the most beautiful cities in the world with some lovely travel companions, and honestly, I really didn’t miss the connection. And spending so little time in front of a computer screen was a bit unusual, but not disconcerting. It was a nice break, and not at all stressful.

 The one exception? Maps and navigation. I missed Google Maps on my Blackberry quite literally every day — sure, there were times when we were content to simply stroll through Rome’s crooked streets with no destination in mind. But on occasions where we were looking for something specific, it was so frustrating not to have an easy way to navigate to it. (Most maps of Rome don’t include all its tiny streets, which added to the problem.) 

What do I make of this experience? That my relationship to technology is still very functional — I miss it when it can help me do something, but I don’t miss it for its own sake. Not at addict after all! Whew. This was my big epiphany. That, and the realization that  the pasta in Italy really is as good as everyone says it is. 

Tuesday, December 6, 2011